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· Means is most often followed by of: a means of noise reduction. African informal), tight as a duck's arse (taboo slang)dishonourable, base, petty, degraded, disgraceful, shameful, shabby, vile, degenerate, callous, sordid, abject, despicable, narrow-minded, contemptible, wretched, scurvy, ignoble, hard-hearted, scungy (Austral. Z.), low-mindedshabby, poor, miserable, run-down, beggarly, seedy, scruffy, sordid, paltry, squalid, tawdry, low-rent (informal, chiefly U.But for, to, and toward are also used: a means for transmitting sound; a means to an end; a means toward achieving equality.associate, colligate, link, relate, tie in, connect, link up - make a logical or causal connection; "I cannot connect these two pieces of evidence in my mind"; "colligate these facts"; "I cannot relate these events at all"normal - conforming with or constituting a norm or standard or level or type or social norm; not abnormal; "serve wine at normal room temperature"; "normal diplomatic relations"; "normal working hours"; "normal word order"; "normal curiosity"; "the normal course of events"nasty, awful - offensive or even (of persons) malicious; "in a nasty mood"; "a nasty accident"; "a nasty shock"; "a nasty smell"; "a nasty trick to pull"; "Will he say nasty things at my funeral? S.), contemptible, wretched, down-at-heel, grungy (slang, chiefly U. S.)excellent, great (informal), outstanding, superb, bad (informal), fine, masterly, wonderful, brilliant (Brit. informal)abhorrent, abominable, antipathetic, contemptible, despicable, despisable, detestable, disgusting, filthy, foul, infamous, loathsome, lousy, low, nasty, nefarious, obnoxious, odious, repugnant, rotten, shabby, vile, wretched.bad-tempered, cantankerous, crabbed, cranky, cross, disagreeable, fretful, grouchy, grumpy, ill-tempered, irascible, irritable, nasty, peevish, petulant, querulous, snappish, snappy, surly, testy, ugly, waspish.It is singular when referring to a particular strategy or method: The best means of securing the cooperation of the builders is to appeal to their self-interest.

* A Rand Corporation study tracked the healthcare spending of 2,756 families over periods of either three or five years during 1974-1982.

For example, families with 75% coverage paid 25% of their healthcare spending up to

* A Rand Corporation study tracked the healthcare spending of 2,756 families over periods of either three or five years during 1974-1982.

For example, families with 75% coverage paid 25% of their healthcare spending up to $1,000 per year (a maximum of $250 out-of-pocket), and insurance paid for everything else.

The results were as follows: Complete or nearly complete coverage for additional inpatient services is common in this country.

In a nutshell, some dudes in Germany (Georg Heinze, Christian Hubrich, and Thomas Halfmann) have found a method to shoot a pulse of light, “stop” that light for about a minute and then get the light going again, using “Electromagnetically Induced Transparency” (EIT). So, for example, when it travels through water or glass and it “slows down” it’s actually just getting absorbed and re-emitted over and over by atoms in whatever it’s traveling through. And if “stopping light” means holding the energy for a while and then re-releasing it later, then what’s the difference between what Heinze, Hubrich, and Halfmann did and what a rock does when it heats up in sunlight and then radiates that heat later (as infrared light)?

The answer to that question, and what makes this experiment important, is that the process preserves the photons’ information.

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* A Rand Corporation study tracked the healthcare spending of 2,756 families over periods of either three or five years during 1974-1982.For example, families with 75% coverage paid 25% of their healthcare spending up to $1,000 per year (a maximum of $250 out-of-pocket), and insurance paid for everything else.The results were as follows: Complete or nearly complete coverage for additional inpatient services is common in this country.In a nutshell, some dudes in Germany (Georg Heinze, Christian Hubrich, and Thomas Halfmann) have found a method to shoot a pulse of light, “stop” that light for about a minute and then get the light going again, using “Electromagnetically Induced Transparency” (EIT). So, for example, when it travels through water or glass and it “slows down” it’s actually just getting absorbed and re-emitted over and over by atoms in whatever it’s traveling through. And if “stopping light” means holding the energy for a while and then re-releasing it later, then what’s the difference between what Heinze, Hubrich, and Halfmann did and what a rock does when it heats up in sunlight and then radiates that heat later (as infrared light)?The answer to that question, and what makes this experiment important, is that the process preserves the photons’ information.

,000 per year (a maximum of 0 out-of-pocket), and insurance paid for everything else.

The results were as follows: Complete or nearly complete coverage for additional inpatient services is common in this country.

In a nutshell, some dudes in Germany (Georg Heinze, Christian Hubrich, and Thomas Halfmann) have found a method to shoot a pulse of light, “stop” that light for about a minute and then get the light going again, using “Electromagnetically Induced Transparency” (EIT). So, for example, when it travels through water or glass and it “slows down” it’s actually just getting absorbed and re-emitted over and over by atoms in whatever it’s traveling through. And if “stopping light” means holding the energy for a while and then re-releasing it later, then what’s the difference between what Heinze, Hubrich, and Halfmann did and what a rock does when it heats up in sunlight and then radiates that heat later (as infrared light)?

The answer to that question, and what makes this experiment important, is that the process preserves the photons’ information.

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